Sokal (song)

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“Sokal”

Single by Nadezhda Misyakova

Released
June 2014

Recorded
April 2014

Genre
Pop, pop-folk

Length
2:56

Writer(s)
Nadezhda Misyakova, Uzari

Nadezhda Misyakova singles chronology

“Delovaya”
(2013)
“Sokal”
(2014)

“Sokal”

Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2014 entry

Country

Belarus

Artist(s)

Nadezhda Misyakova

Language

Belarusian

Composer(s)

Nadezhda Misyakova, Uzari

Lyricist(s)

Nadezhda Misyakova

Finals performance

Final result

7th

Final points

71

Appearance chronology

◄ “Poy so mnoy” (2013)   

“Volshebstvo” (2015) ►

Music video

“Sokal” on YouTube

“Sokal” (Belarusian: Сокал, English: Falcon) is a song by Belarusian singer Nadezhda Misyakova. It represented Belarus at the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2014 in Marsa, Malta, placing 7th with 71 points.[1]”
The song is based on the Belarusian fairytale “Finis, the Fine Falcon.”

Contents

1 Music Video

1.1 Plot

2 External links
3 References

Music Video[edit]
The music video for “Sokal” was mostly shot in a cornfield, in early summer 2014.
Plot[edit]
The video begins with a young girl visiting an art museum. The girl then finds a painting on the walled consisting of Misyakova. The painting then comes to life, which leads to the beginning of the song. The scenes shift between the forests and a wheat field throughout the video. Once the song ends, the scene then shifts back to the museum. This is where we learn that the girl in the beginning was actually Misyakova herself.
External links[edit]

Official Music Video

References[edit]

^ Granger, Anthony (29 August 2014). “Belarus: Nadezhda Misyakova Is Off To Malta”. Eurovoix. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 

Awards and achievements

Preceded by
Ilya Volkov
with
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Willy Andresen

Willy Andresen

Born
(1921-10-18)18 October 1921
Oslo, Norway

Died
17 June 2016(2016-06-17) (aged 94)

Nationality
Norwegian

Occupation
Pianist

Willy Andresen (18 October 1921 – 17 June 2016) was a Norwegian jazz pianist.
He was born in Oslo, and was appointed at the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation from 1959 to 1991.[1]
He often backed singer Erik Bye during his performances in Norway and the United States.[2] He was in charge of several of the song recordings by child star Grethe Kausland,[3] and composed the melody of Otto Nielsen’s song “Pappa’n til Tove Mette”.[4]
References[edit]

^ Godal, Anne Marit (ed.). “Willy Andresen”. Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Norsk nettleksikon. Retrieved 12 July 2016. 
^ Bonde, Arne. “Erik Bye”. In Helle, Knut. Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 12 July 2016. 
^ Larsen, Svend Erik Løken. “Grethe Kausland”. In Helle, Knut. Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 12 July 2016. 
^ Larsen, Svend Erik Løken. “Otto Nielsen”. In Helle, Knut. Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 12 July 2016. 

This Norwegian biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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써니넷

High Bandwidth Memory

Cut through a graphics card that uses High Bandwidth Memory. See the TSVs.

High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) is a high-performance RAM interface for 3D-stacked DRAM from AMD and Hynix. It is to be used in conjunction with high-performance graphics accelerators and network devices.[1] The first devices to use HBM are the AMD Fiji GPUs.[2][3]
High Bandwidth Memory has been adopted by JEDEC as an industry standard in October 2013.[4] The second generation, HBM2, was accepted by JEDEC in January 2016.[5]

Contents

1 Technology

1.1 Interface
1.2 HBM 2

2 History
3 Future
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Technology[edit]
HBM achieves higher bandwidth while using less power in a substantially smaller form factor than DDR4 or GDDR5.[6] This is achieved by stacking up to eight DRAM dies, including an optional base die with a memory controller, which are interconnected by through-silicon vias (TSV) and microbumps. The HBM technology is similar in principle but incompatible with the Hybrid Memory Cube interface developed by Micron Technology.[7]
HBM memory bus is very wide in comparison to other DRAM memories such as DDR4 or GDDR5. An HBM stack of four DRAM dies (4-Hi) has two 128-bit channels per die for a total of 8 channels and a width of 1024 bits in total. A graphics card/GPU with four 4-Hi HBM stacks would therefore have a memory bus with a width of 4096 bits. In comparison, the bus width of GDDR memories is 32 bits, with 16 channels for a graphics card with a 512-bit memory interface.[8] HBM will support up to 4 GB per package.
Interface[edit]
The HBM DRAM is tightly coupled to the host compute die with a distributed interface. The interface is divided into independent channels. Each channel is completely independent of one another. Channels are not necessarily synchronous to each other. The HBM DRAM uses a wide-interface architecture to achieve high-speed, low-power operation. The HBM DRAM uses a 500 MHz differential clock CK_t/CK_c. Commands are registered at the rising edge of CK_t, CK_c. Each channel interface maintains a 128 bit data bus operating at DDR data rates. HBM supports transfer rates of 1 GT/s per pin (transferring 1 bit), yielding an overall package bandwidth of 128 GB/s.[9]
HBM 2[edit]
The second generation of High Bandwidth Memory, HBM 2, also specifies up to 8 dies per stack and doubles pin transfer rates up to 2 GT/s. Retaining 1024-bit wide access, HBM2 is able to reach 256 GB/s memory bandwidth per package. The HBM2 spec
초대남

Farmers Insurance Group

Not to be confused with State Farm Insurance.

Farmers Insurance Group

Industry
Financial services

Founded
1928 (1928) (Los Angeles)[1]

Founder
Thomas E. Leavey

Headquarters
4680 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, California, United States

Area served

United States

Key people

Jeff Dailey (CEO)

Services
Insurance, other financial services

Divisions
Farmers Insurance
Foremost Insurance
Bristol West Insurance
21st Century Insurance
Farmers Life

Website
http://www.farmers.com/

Farmers Insurance Group (informally Farmers) is an American insurer group of automobiles, homes and small businesses and also provides other insurance and financial services products. Farmers Insurance has more than 50,000 exclusive and independent agents and approximately 22,000 employees.

Contents

1 History

1.1 1922 to 2000
1.2 2000 to present

2 Operations
3 Products and services
4 Sponsorships

4.1 Farmers Field
4.2 The Farmers Insurance Open
4.3 NASCAR

5 Criticism

5.1 Complaints to state insurance departments
5.2 Lawsuits

6 Financial ratings
7 Customer service record
8 See also
9 References
10 External links

History[edit]

This section contains content that is written like an advertisement. Please help improve it by removing promotional content and inappropriate external links, and by adding encyclopedic content written from a neutral point of view. (February 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

1922 to 2000[edit]

1922

Farmers’ future co-founders John C. Tyler and Thomas E. Leavey first met after Tyler moved to California.[2] Tyler and Leavey had both grown up with rural backgrounds and believed that farmers and ranchers, who had better driving rates than urbanites, deserved lower insurance premiums.[2][3][4] During the 1920s, farmers across the United States were establishing their own mutual insurance firms and cooperatives in order to have less expensive policies. Tyler, the son of South Dakotan insurance salesman, and Leavey, who had formerly worked for the Federal Farm Loan Bureau and the National Farm Loan Association, recognized that these farmers, ranchers, and other rural drivers were an overlooked market and wished to create their own auto insurance firm.[2][3]

1927

Tyler and Leavey received a loan from the founder of Bank of America, enabling them to start their company.[2]

1928

Tyler and Leavey opened the doors to their newly founded company, Farmers Automobile Inter-Insurance Exchange, in downt
야동사이트

Glowsticking

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

A flower pattern from flow artist Nick Woolsey captured through long exposure photography; photograph is an example of light painting

Glowsticking is a form of object manipulation or dancing with glowsticks or other glowstick-like objects that share the same qualities: durability, consistency in light, safe to toss around, and the material of which they are made, often a soft and pliant plastic.
Glowsticking is an “umbrella term” describing two broad categories, with the most agreed upon separation being whether it is stringed or not stringed. More importantly, glowsticking has roots in the electronica and rave scenes, and has a cultural paradigm more in common with those scenes than those of other scenes. Some aspects include the culture of non-competitiveness, preferring sharing and performing in accordance with your observer, without any kind of negative statement implied. Because of this glowsticking competitions are frowned upon by most practitioners of glowsticking. Although glowsticking as a field can largely be practiced anywhere, the roots it has with raving has led to the adoption of most of the ideals of the rave scene. In recent days complete glow stick costumes have been created that attach to one’s body, the two most popular being from Crayola and Glowstickables.[1]

Contents

1 Forms

1.1 Glowstringing
1.2 Freehand
1.3 Lightshows

2 History and culture
3 Criticism
4 See also
5 References

Forms[edit]
Both of these terms, freehand and glowstringing, describe the technical skills that relates to both. It is only when the practitioner intends to dance that it becomes glowsticking. Otherwise, they may be a juggler who is simply choosing to juggle glowsticks (in the case of freehand), or a poist who is doing poi with glowsticks. That is not to say that a juggler or a poist cannot dance if they so choose with glowsticks—just that glowsticking implies dancing.[2]
Glowstringing[edit]
Glowstringing is defined by a few factors: the use of glowsticks on a string, the swinging motion, and an equally large growing category of moves and concepts that share many of the same aspects as many other stringing related fields, such as poi, yo-yoing, and martial arts forms common with swords, fla
19다모아

1996 ITT Automotive Grand Prix of Detroit

1996 ITT Automotive Detroit

Race details

Race 8 of 16 in the 1996 IndyCar season

Date
June 9, 1996

Official name
ITT Automotive Grand Prix of Detroit

Location
Belle Isle, Detroit, United States

Course
Temporary street course
2.1 mi / 3.4 km

Distance
77 (72 laps completed) laps
mi / km

Weather
Temperatures reaching up to 65.8 °F (18.8 °C); wind speeds up to 12.8 miles per hour (20.6 km/h)[1]

Pole position

Driver
Scott Pruett (Patrick Racing)

Time
1:11:802

Podium

First
Michael Andretti (Newman/Haas Racing)

Second
Christian Fittipaldi (Newman/Haas Racing)

Third
Gil de Ferran (Jim Hall Racing)

The 1996 ITT Automotive Grand Prix of Detroit was a CART race which happened at the Belle Isle Park. It happened on June 9, 1996. It was the 8th round of the 1996 IndyCar season.

Contents

1 Race

1.1 Lap 2
1.2 Lap 4
1.3 Lap 13
1.4 Some laps later
1.5 Lap 25
1.6 Laps 36-37
1.7 Lap 46
1.8 Lap 57
1.9 Lap 61
1.10 Lap 65
1.11 1 lap after the restart
1.12 Lap 72

2 Final results

2.1 Drivers who did not completed the race
2.2 Did not started the race

3 Point standings
4 References

Race[edit]
Lap 2[edit]
Christian Fittipaldi takes the lead from Scott Pruett.
Lap 4[edit]
Top 6: Christian Fittipaldi, Gil de Ferran, Paul Tracy, Scott Pruett, Robby Gordon and Michael Andretti. First full course caution was out after Gordon had hit the tire wall. Green flag came out on lap 10.
Lap 13[edit]
Top 12: Christian Fittipaldi, Gil de Ferran, Paul Tracy, Michael Andretti, Scott Pruett, André Ribeiro, Adrian Fernandez, Al Unser, Jr., Bobby Rahal, Parker Johnstone, Mark Blundell and Alex Zanardi.
Some laps later[edit]
Second full course caution, as Greg Moore and André Ribeiro crashed. Neither the Canadian, nor the Brazilian had retired. One lap later, Gil de Ferran spun after leaving the pits.
Lap 25[edit]
Top 6: Christian Fittipaldi, Michael Andretti, Paul Tracy, Gil de Ferran, Al Unser, Jr. and Bobby Rahal. Green flag came out on lap 31.
Laps 36-37[edit]
At the very same curve, Emerson Fittipaldi and André Ribeiro crashed, but not simultaneously. Fittipaldi brushed the wall on lap 36. Ribeiro would do the same on the following lap. Both drivers retired.
Lap 46[edit]
Shades of 1994 came out, as Al Unser, Jr. and Paul Tracy once again were involved into a crash. Two years before, both drivers collided, as Little Al went into the tyre barrier. The same fate happened on lap 46 of the 1996 race. Third caut
19다모아

Fort Valley, Arizona

Fort Valley, Arizona

census-designated place

Fort Valley, Arizona

Location in the United States

Coordinates: 35°14′10.03″N 111°44′43.59″W / 35.2361194°N 111.7454417°W / 35.2361194; -111.7454417

Country
United States

State
Arizona

County
Coconino

Population (2010)

 • Total
779

Time zone
MST (no daylight saving time) (UTC-7)

Area code(s)
928

Fort Valley is a census-designated place in the southern portion of Coconino County in the state of Arizona. Fort Valley is located very close to the city of Flagstaff. The population as of the 2010 U.S. Census was 779.[1]
History[edit]
Fort Valley is a historical settlement at the base of Mt. Agassiz in Flagstaff, Arizona. It gained its name as a fort that was established to defend against Apache tribes although it was never actually used. Wagon trains migrating from the east came upon Flagstaff and settled here. Many of the old settlements can still be seen today. The primary motivation for this settlement was logging as was true for the rest of Flagstaff. The ponderosa pine forest supplied abundant amounts of timber which were then transported via railroad.
The first Fort Valley settlers were Laura and William Murphy in 1881, they belonged to the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. After these first settlers many more followed. Eventually a small community was developed and Fort Valley became a ranching hub in northern Arizona. As ranching took hold in Fort Valley the effect on the environment was devastating. Water sources such as Leroux spring ran dark with silt and the land was becoming a victim of overgrazing. In 1908 Gustaf Adolf Pearson arrived in Fort Valley as a member of the forest service and began to revive the area.
Fort Valley was also a popular hub for the scientific community to collect data on recently obtained land in the Southwest. Because of the unique combination of a desert and a mountain environment the area was particularly interesting for geologists, paleontologists, and scientists alike.
Present[edit]
Fort Valley remains a settlement today. The suburb of Flagstaff Arizona still holds a number of small farms and ranches. The Leroux spring has been taken over by the city of Flagstaff and the city is considering it as a potential water source. Fort Valley remains a wide open meadow at the base of what is now Snowbowl Road. Much of the past wildlife such as deer, herons, and elk remain in the area.

References[edit]

^
야플티비

Barrick

Barrick is a name that may refer to:

Companies

Barrick Gold, the world’s largest gold mining company
Barrick Gaming Corporation, a Las Vegas-based gambling company

People

Barrick Nealy, a football quarterback in the CFL
Dean Barrick, a retired English football player
Des Barrick, a deceased English cricket player

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Barrick.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

한국야동

London Conference of 1866

The London Conference was held in the United Kingdom and began on 4 December 1866,[1] and it was the final in a series of conferences or debates that led to Canadian confederation in 1867. Sixteen delegates from the Province of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick gathered with officials of the British government to draft the British North America Act, 1867. This was a continuation of the Quebec Conference held earlier about the “Seventy-two Resolutions”. A major issue of contention was the education system, with Roman Catholic bishops lobbying for guarantees protecting the separate school system. This was opposed by delegates from the Maritimes, and the compromise reached was Section 93 of the act, which guaranteed separate school systems in Quebec and Ontario but not in Nova Scotia or New Brunswick. The result of this meeting was the British North America Act. This was the last of the conferences discussing Confederation.
John A. Macdonald was the chairman of the conference. The Queen of the United Kingdom (Queen Victoria) assented to the bill and the Dominion of Canada was created when it came into force on July 1, 1867.
See also[edit]

Quebec Conference, 1864
Anti-Confederation Party

References[edit]

^ “London Conference”. The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2011-11-10. 

External links[edit]

Canadian Confederation: The London Conference at Collections Canada

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Constitution of Canada

List of Constitutional Documents

 
Pre-Confederation constitutional documents

Iroquois constitution
Mi’kmaq constitution
Constitution of New France
Royal Proclamation of 1763
Quebec Act of 1774
Constitutional Act of 1791
Declaration of Independence of Lower Canada (1838)
Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839)
Act of Union 1840

 
Confederation

Charlottetown Conference, 1864
Quebec Conference, 1864

Quebec Resolutions

London Conference, 1866
Fathers of Confederation

Constitution Act, 1867

Canadian federalism
Preamble
Section 121
Section 125

Powers under
Section 91

Peace, order, and good government
Trade and commerce
Criminal law
Matters excepted from s. 92

Powers under
Section 92

Licensing
Works and undertakings
Property and civil rights
Administration of justice
Fines and penalties for provincial laws
Matters of a local or private nature

 
Amendments and other constitutional documents 1867–1982

British North Ame
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Return to Japan

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Return to Japan

Live album by Lana Lane

Released
2003

Genre
Rock

Lana Lane chronology

Winter Sessions
(2003)
Return to Japan
(2004)
Storybook: Tales from Europe and Japan
(2004)

Return to Japan is the second live album by symphonic rock vocalist, Lana Lane, released in 2004. The album is Lane’s 10th album release overall (by U.S. release only), while also being her 15th album over (by Japanese release). Unlike Lane’s first live album, Live in Japan, this album was not only released in Japan, but was also released in the U.S.
The album spans over two discs, featuring live concerts Lana has performed from 1998-2002.

NOTE: The first 4 tracks featured on Disc One are actually one performance, as those 4 songs are performed as a medley.

Track listing[edit]
Disc one[edit]

No.
Title
Length

1.
“Dark Water Part III”  
1:59

2.
“Fanfare for The Dragon Isle”  
0:43

3.
“Garden of the Moon”  
1:18

4.
“In the Hall of the Ocean Queen”  
0:40

5.
“Escher’s Staircase”  
6:09

6.
“The Beast Within You”  
5:41

7.
“Rainbow’s End”  
7:06

8.
“Queen of the Ocean”  
7:04

9.
“Project Shangri-La”  
5:37

10.
“Evolution Revolution”  
8:29

11.
“Frankenstein Unbound”  
6:16

12.
“Athena’s Shadow”  
4:55

13.
“Night Falls”  
7:42

14.
“Astrology Prelude”  
3:31

15.
“Redemption Part II”  
1:12

16.
“Secrets of Astrology”  
5:43

Disc Two[edit]

No.
Title
Length

1.
“Take a Breath”  
4:25

2.
“Stardust”  
4:56

3.
“Symphony of Angels”  
5:20

4.
“Dream On”  
4:02

5.
“Alexandria”  
5:15

6.
“Autumn Leaves”  
4:03

7.
“Let Heaven In”  
6:51

8.
“Dreamcurrents”  
0:29

9.
“Avalon”  
4:22

10.
“Seasons End”  
4:50

11.
“In the Court of the Crimson King”  
9:09

12.
“Long Live Rock ‘n’ Roll”  
4:53

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Lana Lane

Lana Lane
Erik Norlander

Peer Verschuren
Ernst Van Ee
Kristoffer Gildenlöw
Mark McCrite
Neil Citron
Don Schiff

Studio albums

Secrets of Astrology

Live albums

Return to Japan

Related bands

Rocket Scientists

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